Will You Be Obsolete?

8 04 2011

Toothless and Taking Over

At my house we love Spongebob Squarepants and we usually watch it through Roku, commercial-free.  For some reason last Saturday we were watching it on a regular TV broadcast when a commercial came on and interrupted the show.  My daughter looked up from her doll and said “What’s that?”

“What’s what?” I replied.

“That,” pointing to the TV.

“The commercial?” I asked, wondering if I knew what she was talking about.

“What’s a commercial?” she asked.

It struck me that a kid today doesn’t recognize what commercial is, even though she watches TV.  We have unlimited access to a surplus of entertainment choices, yet only see commercials if we are ignoring our technological advantages.  What does this mean for advertisers and entertainment companies?  How will this affect revenue streams as technology continues to advance at a rapid pace?

Later that day at the park, three little kids were swinging on the swings next to us.  A kid no older than 8 took out his iPhone and filmed a video of his friends on the swings.  He pressed a few buttons and then announced that he uploaded the video to his YouTube channel and posted the link on his Facebook page.  The whole process couldn’t have taken him more than two minutes.  I was blown away.  His actions were natural and almost automatic for him, easier than remembering to say “please” and “thank you.”  Does he realize that his personal life is accessible to billions of people?  Does he even know what a “billion” is?  Do we really understand how “social networking” affects our reputations and relationships?  How will all of this progress 5, 10, 20 years from now?

That night at bedtime, my son was practicing reading one of his favorite books.  His little fingers struggled to turn the page.  As we waited patiently for him to find a proper grip, he broke the silence by saying “Loading..,” equating the experience to a slow webpage.  This guy is not yet 6 years old, he is missing several teeth, and he is more comfortable on a computer than a lot of adults I know.  What will it mean when his generation enters the workplace?  What current jobs will be totally obsolete?  Will he study things in college that are outdated the day he graduates?

All of these circumstances are glimpses into the future, and commentary on the present.  The rate of advancement in technology, business, and healthcare in the last 20 years has been significant. Building on that foundation, the next 20 years will see more extreme change than this planet has ever known.  Change is not coming, it is here.  Keep up or be irrelevant.

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” Charles Darwin





Full Disclosure

27 08 2010

The blind date is a thing of the past – in personal relationships and in business.  You would not date someone without looking at their Facebook page first.  You would not buy online without investigating the company website.  People, products and services are available to anyone at anytime.  Websites and social media portholes give us complete access to all kinds of information about the people we want to date, work with, or buy from.

Consider this:  You need to choose a dentist.  You go online and search for dentists in your area.  You find two sites:

Dentist #1:  This site has a phone number, a catchy slogan about your smile, and offers some kind of special deal.

Dentist #2:  This site has a picture of the staff, a video tour of the facility, and comments from happy clients.  500 people “Like” them on Facebook.  The main dentist has posted a video.  He looks right into the camera and tells you why he loves his job and why healthy teeth are important.  He cracks a dry joke and has a pleasant demeanor.  He seems like a nice guy that you can trust.

Now, which dentist are you going to choose?

This is the age of transparency.  If you are not forthcoming about yourself, you seem to be hiding something, and are not to be trusted – or at least you will not be trusted nearly as much as someone that puts themselves out there for public view.

Trust is the complete confidence that something is as it appears.  In marketing, in sales, the common approach is to present a pretty picture and make something seem better than it actually is – that approach causes distrust.  How can you avoid it?

Portray yourself honestly, expose your true character – love you or hate you, people know who they are dealing with.  Those that align with you do so with full disclosure, full knowledge, and they participate by choice.  Why should people have to spend so much time trying to figure out the truth?  You are what you are.  Be that.  Show that.

I write this blog to be a resource for my network and to expose my true character.  Sometimes I am serious and sometimes I am silly – and good or bad, I put it all out there publicly.  This video is a little behind the scenes from last week’s photo shoot.  Judge me as you will – I only hope that I can encourage you to reveal yourself.








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